How to Improve Your Sales Technique to Sell More Kitchens and Baths

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Guest Blog by Rita Melkonian

Knowing how to communicate with your potential clients is one of the most important factors when closing a kitchen or bathroom remodel sale.

Professional remodelers have all the technical skills necessary to get the job done, but they also need to work on their sales technique if they want to grow their business. Whether it’s practicing your sales pitch on your own or investing in sales training, it’s important to work on your technique for the success of your remodeling business.

Read on to learn how to improve your sales technique to sell more kitchens and baths.

Practice your sales pitch

Sales is a skill. And like all skills, it takes time to develop and it requires a lot of practice.

Practicing your sales pitch doesn’t mean you should learn a script by heart. There are certain elements you should re-use for every client, but keep in mind every customer is different and they all have different tastes and needs.

Practicing with family and friends is a great way to improve your sales technique. Ask them to play the role of a customer who wants to remodel their kitchen and take it from there. The more you practice, the easier it will get.

Invest in sales training

If you’re not confident in your sales technique and you don’t think you can improve it on your own, you can always turn to professional development providers that offer webinars and other training material.

You can also find other formal sales training programs (both online and in-person) that will help you refine your sales technique so you can close more sales.

Listen to your clients’ needs

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The most important part of successfully closing a kitchen and bath remodel deal is to listen to your clients.

Really listen.

Give them a chance to tell you about their wants, their needs, and their general views on the remodeling project. The less you talk about your views, at least at the beginning of your meeting, the better.

Don’t interrupt your client, and don’t overwhelm them with technical talk. This will discourage them from opening up and really expressing what they want from your company.

Ask relevant questions

The easiest way to determine if you’re a good match and to get your client to talk to you about their expectations is to ask them relevant questions. Many remodelers have a checklist prepared, and you should use one to cover all the basis.

Your checklist should contain questions such as:

  • How did you find out about our company?
  • Why do you want to remodel?
  • Tell me about the project as you see it.
  • How much research have you done so far?
  • What is your budget?
  • What is your time frame for the completion of the project?
  • Are there other decision-makers involved?

Remember, do not overwhelm them. The goal of asking these questions is to get your client to open up and to tell you exactly what they expect and what they want from you.

Show examples of previous work

If you have images of previous design projects you can share with your clients, it will make it easier for them to trust your work.

Even if they’ve done some research and have checked out your portfolio, it doesn’t hurt to discuss your previous work. You can show them 3D renderings created in kitchen and bath design software such as 2020 Design and then show them the completed project to compare. It always adds a “wow” factor

Check out this webinar if you want to learn more about how to take your remodeling business to the next level.

Hashtags: #remodeling #homeimprovement #interiordesign #salestechniques #salestraining #sales


Rita MelkonianAbout the Author

Rita Melkonian is a marketing content specialist at 2020, provider of interior design and space planning applications, where she researches and writes content related to the world of interior design. She graduated from Concordia University with a bachelor’s degree in English literature in 2012 and has been a professional writer for the past five years.

 

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